Sound Like a Native

Collocations are two or more words that usually go together and sound more natural to native speakers.  For instance, instead of saying “have a break” native speakers would say “take a break.”  Instead of saying “make a crime” native speakers would say “commit a crime.”  Instead of saying “wash the dishes” native speakers would say “do the dishes.”  It’s not necessarily that the other sentences are wrong, it’s just not how native English speakers talk.

www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/collocations.htm

http://esl.about.com/library/vocabulary/blcollocation_1.htm

www.better-english.com/strongcoll.htm

Pronunciation Podcasts

blabIf you want to practice your English pronunciation skills, you need to listen to words and sounds closely so that you can understand those little differences between similarly sounding words.  You can do this by listening to the radio, speaking with native speakers, or listening to pronunciation tapes.

Here you will find links to several pronunciation lessons that you can listen to and read along with in order to properly pronounce your English words.

Lesson 1: www.blabbinit.com/content/podcast-3-pronunciation-1-button-bottom-launch-lunch-bought-live-leave-sleep-slip

Lesson 2: www.blabbinit.com/content/podcast-5-pronunciation-2-stuff-staff-hair-her-cut-caught

Lesson 3: www.blabbinit.com/content/podcast-9-pronunciation-boss-bus-truck-track-cold-called

Lesson 4: www.blabbinit.com/content/podcast-20-pronunciation-cold-called-word-world-got-gut

Idioms Crossword Puzzle

crosswordDo you like English idioms?  Do you like crossword puzzles?  Well, then you’ll love this English Idioms Crossword Puzzle!  This game uses 32 common idioms that are used in everyday English and places them in a fun and easy to do crossword puzzle.  Print out the pages, but don’t look at the third page because those are where the answers are.  When you’re finished you can check your answers to see how well you know your English idioms!

www.eslmania.com/students/idioms/crossword_puzzle.pdf

Identifying Adjective Clauses

adjectivesAdjective Clauses are dependent clauses that modify a noun.  They are used to give additional or background information on the nouns they are describing.  Adjective Clauses always follow the nouns that they are modifying, but they are not necessarily used directly after the noun.  Most Adjective Clauses begin with a relative pronoun “who, which, that” or a relative adverb “when, where, why” so you can easily identify them in a sentence.  Check out some of the links below to learn how to identify and practice writing Adjective Clauses.

www.chompchomp.com/terms/adjectiveclause.htm

http://www.eslbee.com/AdjClauses.htm

http://vistawww.peralta.edu/Projects/10134/English%20130/week6adjclausesappositives.pdf

http://grammar.about.com/od/basicsentencegrammar/a/adjclause.htm

www.ehow.com/how_4715026_identify-adjective-clauses.html

http://www.learnenglishfeelgood.com/lefg1_adjectiveclauses1.html

http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/StudyZone/410/grammar/adj.htm